Create Lasting Relationships with Your Clients

 

Make a Friend Day on February 11 is an unofficial holiday that encourages people to stop and take stock of their social circles and make new friends. Separating the personal and the professional is always important, but it’s easier to be personable as you work if you see your clients through a friendly lens.

 

Professional friendships are built upon a number of valuable facets—reliability, availability, proactivity, and so forth. Personal friendships rely on these facets too, to some degree. Make comparisons as you have your marketing mentality hat on, checking to see if you’re a reliable, available, and proactive professional friend.

 

A good way to start, and a good way to get closer to people no matter the setting, is by asking questions. Tweak these however you like, but here are some conversation points to get the ball rolling with your clients – current or potential:

  • How do you see your industry changing in the next 3–5 years?
  • Are A/E/C firms responding well to your needs? How can A/E/C firms improve their service to you?
  • What is your 3–5 year projected budget and capital development wish list?
  • What are the three most important characteristics you value in an A/E/C firm?
  • What keeps you up at night when thinking about your design/construction needs?

 

As you keep within professional lines, remember to emulate the attention and care you give to your personal friends. With that in mind, get out there and make some new ones!

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About The Author

Beth Fillerup

Beth Fillerup is an AEC marketing consultant based in San Luis Obispo, California. She has over 25 years of experience in the design and building industry, having worked in marketing for architecture, engineering, and construction firms. She has published articles in North American Clean Energy, Municipal Water Leader, and Utah Construction and Design Magazine. She has been sourced as an industry expert on Houzz.com.

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